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Homemade Fishing Lure Dryer - YouTube

Ezyoutdoor Breathable Outdoor Jungle Fishing 360 Degree UV Protection Sun Block Quick-drying Hat with Removable Sun Shield & Mask,One Size Fit Most (Khaki)

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Flex Coat Cordless Lure Drying Wheel - Lure Parts Online

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I'm glad you commented here. I was thinking the same thing myself regarding lure drying racks.

When I first got some Envirotex Lite to clear coat my first few lures I went about reading everything I could find on the subject. It would seem that most guys use a lure turning wheel of some sort to keep their lures rotating while their clear coats level out and set up. Well if that is what everyone else was doing then that is what I would need to do - right.

I set about building a fairly simple turning wheel that would work in the chuck of one of my cordless drills and it worked quite well initially on a test run with some lures without epoxy on them . When I went about actually using the turning wheel for clear coating my lures disaster very nearly struck!

What happened was that some of the epoxy naturally worked it's way into the 'jaws' that were holding the lures by their noses. This epoxy had the unexpected effect of lubricating the 'jaws' causing the lures to slip out and fall on the floor. Luckily I had a clean scrap of plywood placed on the floor beneath the turning rack so no harm came to the lures. I simply touched in any of the epoxy that had been rubbed off and hung up the lure by their noses to dry kind of expecting the worst!

I'm sure you know what happened though - the clear coat levelled out nicely, all the excess dripped off onto the floor and the end result was a near perfect clear coat. As you can see I learned by accident that hanging lures statically gives a very acceptable finish to my clear coats.

My clear coating procedure differs to yours slightly in that I return to my lures every 10 minutes or so in the first hour to turn them nose over tail (or vice-versa). Each time I turn them I inspect them for dimples or dust boogers in the coating and 'touch in' where necessary. I have on a few occasions been able to find dimples in the epoxy on my third or fourth time of turning that I had somehow missed earlier.

Although I probably will go ahead and build a lure turning wheel of some sort eventually it is not something that is high on my list of lure making priorities at the moment. As you quite rightly pointed out the less moving parts the better!

Joe.

@

I'm glad you commented here. I was thinking the same thing myself regarding lure drying racks.

When I first got some Envirotex Lite to clear coat my first few lures I went about reading everything I could find on the subject. It would seem that most guys use a lure turning wheel of some sort to keep their lures rotating while their clear coats level out and set up. Well if that is what everyone else was doing then that is what I would need to do - right.

I set about building a fairly simple turning wheel that would work in the chuck of one of my cordless drills and it worked quite well initially on a test run with some lures without epoxy on them . When I went about actually using the turning wheel for clear coating my lures disaster very nearly struck!

What happened was that some of the epoxy naturally worked it's way into the 'jaws' that were holding the lures by their noses. This epoxy had the unexpected effect of lubricating the 'jaws' causing the lures to slip out and fall on the floor. Luckily I had a clean scrap of plywood placed on the floor beneath the turning rack so no harm came to the lures. I simply touched in any of the epoxy that had been rubbed off and hung up the lure by their noses to dry kind of expecting the worst!

I'm sure you know what happened though - the clear coat levelled out nicely, all the excess dripped off onto the floor and the end result was a near perfect clear coat. As you can see I learned by accident that hanging lures statically gives a very acceptable finish to my clear coats.

My clear coating procedure differs to yours slightly in that I return to my lures every 10 minutes or so in the first hour to turn them nose over tail (or vice-versa). Each time I turn them I inspect them for dimples or dust boogers in the coating and 'touch in' where necessary. I have on a few occasions been able to find dimples in the epoxy on my third or fourth time of turning that I had somehow missed earlier.

Although I probably will go ahead and build a lure turning wheel of some sort eventually it is not something that is high on my list of lure making priorities at the moment. As you quite rightly pointed out the less moving parts the better!

Joe.

3097 Flex Coat Lure Drum: The ultimate lure drying machine

Rotating Fishing Lure Drying Rack by sthone - Thingiverse

@

I'm glad you commented here. I was thinking the same thing myself regarding lure drying racks.

When I first got some Envirotex Lite to clear coat my first few lures I went about reading everything I could find on the subject. It would seem that most guys use a lure turning wheel of some sort to keep their lures rotating while their clear coats level out and set up. Well if that is what everyone else was doing then that is what I would need to do - right.

I set about building a fairly simple turning wheel that would work in the chuck of one of my cordless drills and it worked quite well initially on a test run with some lures without epoxy on them . When I went about actually using the turning wheel for clear coating my lures disaster very nearly struck!

What happened was that some of the epoxy naturally worked it's way into the 'jaws' that were holding the lures by their noses. This epoxy had the unexpected effect of lubricating the 'jaws' causing the lures to slip out and fall on the floor. Luckily I had a clean scrap of plywood placed on the floor beneath the turning rack so no harm came to the lures. I simply touched in any of the epoxy that had been rubbed off and hung up the lure by their noses to dry kind of expecting the worst!

I'm sure you know what happened though - the clear coat levelled out nicely, all the excess dripped off onto the floor and the end result was a near perfect clear coat. As you can see I learned by accident that hanging lures statically gives a very acceptable finish to my clear coats.

My clear coating procedure differs to yours slightly in that I return to my lures every 10 minutes or so in the first hour to turn them nose over tail (or vice-versa). Each time I turn them I inspect them for dimples or dust boogers in the coating and 'touch in' where necessary. I have on a few occasions been able to find dimples in the epoxy on my third or fourth time of turning that I had somehow missed earlier.

Although I probably will go ahead and build a lure turning wheel of some sort eventually it is not something that is high on my list of lure making priorities at the moment. As you quite rightly pointed out the less moving parts the better!

Joe.

@

I'm glad you commented here. I was thinking the same thing myself regarding lure drying racks.

When I first got some Envirotex Lite to clear coat my first few lures I went about reading everything I could find on the subject. It would seem that most guys use a lure turning wheel of some sort to keep their lures rotating while their clear coats level out and set up. Well if that is what everyone else was doing then that is what I would need to do - right.

I set about building a fairly simple turning wheel that would work in the chuck of one of my cordless drills and it worked quite well initially on a test run with some lures without epoxy on them . When I went about actually using the turning wheel for clear coating my lures disaster very nearly struck!

What happened was that some of the epoxy naturally worked it's way into the 'jaws' that were holding the lures by their noses. This epoxy had the unexpected effect of lubricating the 'jaws' causing the lures to slip out and fall on the floor. Luckily I had a clean scrap of plywood placed on the floor beneath the turning rack so no harm came to the lures. I simply touched in any of the epoxy that had been rubbed off and hung up the lure by their noses to dry kind of expecting the worst!

I'm sure you know what happened though - the clear coat levelled out nicely, all the excess dripped off onto the floor and the end result was a near perfect clear coat. As you can see I learned by accident that hanging lures statically gives a very acceptable finish to my clear coats.

My clear coating procedure differs to yours slightly in that I return to my lures every 10 minutes or so in the first hour to turn them nose over tail (or vice-versa). Each time I turn them I inspect them for dimples or dust boogers in the coating and 'touch in' where necessary. I have on a few occasions been able to find dimples in the epoxy on my third or fourth time of turning that I had somehow missed earlier.

Although I probably will go ahead and build a lure turning wheel of some sort eventually it is not something that is high on my list of lure making priorities at the moment. As you quite rightly pointed out the less moving parts the better!

Joe.