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Stanford Lures Making Wood Crankbaits - Lure Lip Process

Crankbait Building Kit by Muddy Bros (Build 20 Quality Lures)

$39.95


Two Methods: Planning Your Lure Making the Lure Community Q&A

What Lures To Make And Why?I am one of those people who is very often guilty of spending time getting ready to get ready to do something rather than just getting on and doing it - waiting to have every little thing ready or until everything is perfect. In the case of making my first few lures and indeed writing this lure making blog I plan to just get on with it and figure things out as I go along. With this in mind it is very unlikely that my first few lures will . . . . .

Wooden lures make a different sound to plastic lures. It’s more a natural sound, easier for fish to hear. And, if you fish in highly pressured waters, it’s also different to the sound made by all those mass produced lures. You know, the ones fish have learned from experience to avoid?

Lure Making Supplies, Lure Components

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@ Hey Mowie Man, thanks for stopping by my blog and of course your kind comments. Well let's see if I can solve your lure painting problems.

As for your question 1, here's the deal. Different paints made by different paint companies can sometimes react badly with each other. Sometimes even different coloured paints made by the same company will react with each other. The same is true of paints and resins - some react and some don't.

The only way to find out which paints and/or resins react with each other is by trial and error. I have learned this the hard way by having to completely sand down (back to the bare wood) lures that were nearly finished! I now take a scrap of wood, apply some primer and then experiment with any new types of paint that I plan to use on my lures to make sure that there will be no problems.

When I come across two paints that react badly with each other then this is what I do - and this will solve your gold paint problem also. I very simply use a clear lacquer between the coats of paint (or paint and resin in your case). So, what you'll need to do is find a clear spray on lacquer or varnish to apply over your gold paint, thus creating a barrier between the gold paint and resin.

It sounds to me like your gold paint reacts with solvents though so I'd suggest getting some clear water-based varnish and dipping your gold painted lure into that (thin it down a little first though). Experiment on a scrap of wood first - spray on some gold paint, apply some water based varnish and then cover with your resin (leaving the correct time between coats to dry of course) and that should do the trick.

As for your question 2 it sounds like you are not getting the mix of resin and hardener right. I have of course made this same mistake myself a number of times ending up with lures covered in tacky resin that just wont cure. The only solution unfortunately is to scrape/sand the whole lure back and start painting all over again.

You really need to be accurate when mixing your resin and hardener and you have to be sure that you mix the two together fully (I mix mine continually for at least two minutes with a flat sided stirring stick to make sure I get all the stuff out of the bottom corners of the little medicine tubs I use). I actually set a timer for myself so I know for sure I have been mixing for at least two minutes.

Working with resin is probably one of the most tricky parts of the lure making process to learn. It is well worth the effort though, your homemade lures really look well with a clear glossy epoxy hardcoat on them!

Well Mowie Man I hope these few pointers help solve your lure making problems.

Joe.

@ Hey Mowie Man, thanks for stopping by my blog and of course your kind comments. Well let's see if I can solve your lure painting problems.

As for your question 1, here's the deal. Different paints made by different paint companies can sometimes react badly with each other. Sometimes even different coloured paints made by the same company will react with each other. The same is true of paints and resins - some react and some don't.

The only way to find out which paints and/or resins react with each other is by trial and error. I have learned this the hard way by having to completely sand down (back to the bare wood) lures that were nearly finished! I now take a scrap of wood, apply some primer and then experiment with any new types of paint that I plan to use on my lures to make sure that there will be no problems.

When I come across two paints that react badly with each other then this is what I do - and this will solve your gold paint problem also. I very simply use a clear lacquer between the coats of paint (or paint and resin in your case). So, what you'll need to do is find a clear spray on lacquer or varnish to apply over your gold paint, thus creating a barrier between the gold paint and resin.

It sounds to me like your gold paint reacts with solvents though so I'd suggest getting some clear water-based varnish and dipping your gold painted lure into that (thin it down a little first though). Experiment on a scrap of wood first - spray on some gold paint, apply some water based varnish and then cover with your resin (leaving the correct time between coats to dry of course) and that should do the trick.

As for your question 2 it sounds like you are not getting the mix of resin and hardener right. I have of course made this same mistake myself a number of times ending up with lures covered in tacky resin that just wont cure. The only solution unfortunately is to scrape/sand the whole lure back and start painting all over again.

You really need to be accurate when mixing your resin and hardener and you have to be sure that you mix the two together fully (I mix mine continually for at least two minutes with a flat sided stirring stick to make sure I get all the stuff out of the bottom corners of the little medicine tubs I use). I actually set a timer for myself so I know for sure I have been mixing for at least two minutes.

Working with resin is probably one of the most tricky parts of the lure making process to learn. It is well worth the effort though, your homemade lures really look well with a clear glossy epoxy hardcoat on them!

Well Mowie Man I hope these few pointers help solve your lure making problems.

Joe.